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Pick-by-pick grades for every team following the 2020 NFL Draft

The 2020 NFL Draft is officially a wrap. We’ve got a grade for every team’s effort following three days and 255 picks.

In this still image from video provided by the NFL, LSU quarterback Joe Burrow celebrates being chosen first by the Cincinnati Bengals during the first round of the 2020 NFL Draft on April 23, 2020. Photo by NFL via Getty Images

The 2020 NFL Draft is complete. We’ve made it through three days and 255 picks, and rosters have been shaped and changed in more ways than we know right now. There are some obvious changes to depth charts, but plenty of day three picks are going to shake things up later this year when football returns.

Arizona Cardinals

Grade: A

Picks

Round 1, pick 8: Isaiah Simmons, LB, Clemson
Round 3, pick 8 (No. 72): Josh Jones, OT, Houston
Round 4, pick 8 (No. 114): Leki Fotu, DT, Utah
Round 4, pick 25 (No. 131): Rashard Lawrence, DT, LSU
Round 6, pick 23 (No. 202): Evan Weaver, ILB, Cal
Round 7, pick 8 (No. 222): Eno Benjamin, RB, Arizona State

The Cardinals took a risk early by not selecting a top-notch offensive lineman with the No. 8 pick. They came away with the top linebacker prospect in the draft in Simmons though. He can balance out a linebacker group led by elite pass rusher Chandler Jones and assist Patrick Peterson in pass coverage after Arizona’s defense gave up the second most passing yards in the league last season. Jones was considered a fringe first-round prospect, but the Cardinals got a steal by getting him in the third round. Getting another versatile running back in Eno Benjamin was the cherry on top for Arizona. Even if only Simmons starts this year, it’s bringing on an impressive crop of young talent.

Atlanta Falcons

Grade: B-

Picks

Round 1, pick 16 (No. 16 overall): A.J. Terrell, CB, Clemson
Round 2, pick 15 (No. 47 overall): Marlon Davidson, DL, Auburn
Round 3, pick 14 (No. 78 overall): Matt Hennessy, C, Temple
Round 4, pick 13 (No. 119 overall): Mykal Walker, ILB, Fresno State
Round 4, pick 28 (No. 134 overall): Jaylinn Hawkins, S, Cal
Round 7, pick 14 (No. 228 overall): Sterling Hofrichter, P, Syracuse

The Falcons stayed put with their 16th overall pick and went with cornerback A.J. Terrell to help replace Desmond Trufant, who they lost in free agency. It was a reach based on need according to many draftniks like ESPN’s Mel Kiper Jr. and USA Today’s Luke Easterling. But, cornerback was at least a need. With their second and third-round picks, the Falcons upgraded their defensive and offensive line, which are always good spots to add depth. In the fourth-round they grabbed a linebacker and safety. Grabbing a linebacker earlier would have been preferred, as it was a position of need, but at least they addressed the need. Overall, fans aren’t going to be walking on air after this draft.

Baltimore Ravens

Grade: A

Picks

Round 1, pick 28 (No. 28 overall): Patrick Queen, LB, LSU
Round 2, pick 23 (No. 55 overall): J.K. Dobbins, RB, Ohio State
Round 3, pick 7 (No. 71): Justin Madubuike, DT, Texas A&M
Round 3, pick 28 (No. 92): Devin Duvernay, WR, Texas
Round 3, pick 34 (No. 98): Malik Harrison, LB, Ohio State
Round 3, pick 42 (No. 106): Tyre Phillips, OT, Mississippi State
Round 4, pick 37 (No. 143): Ben Bredeson, OG, Michigan
Round 5, pick 25 (No. 170): Broderick Washington, Jr, DT, Texas Tech
Round 6, pick 22 (No. 201): James Proche, WR, SMU
Round 7, pick 5 (No. 219): Geno Stone, S, Iowa

The Ravens will play strong defense and run the football once again in 2020, as they declined to add a wide receiver until the 92nd overall pick. Instead, they added LSU linebacker Patrick Queen with their first rounder, then running back J.K. Dobbins with their second round selection. Both are strong picks for what the team wants to continue doing. And that continued with a defensive lineman, linebacker, and two guards through four rounds. Third-round pick, receiver Devin Duvernay, isn’t your prototypical receiver either, as he could end up seeing carries as well with his thick frame and tremendous speed. Overall, the Ravens stuck to their script and came out with good depth to continue dominating opponents in 2020.

Buffalo Bills

Grade: B+

Picks

Round 2, pick 22 (No. 54 overall): A.J. Epenesa, Edge, Iowa
Round 3, pick 22 (No. 86 overall): Zack Moss, RB, Utah
Round 4, pick 22 (No. 128 overall): Gabriel Davis, WR, UCF
Round 5, pick 21 (No. 167 overall): Jake Fromm, QB, Georgia
Round 6, pick 9 (No. 188 overall): Tyler Bass, K, Georgia Southern
Round 6, pick 28 (No. 207 overall): Isaiah Hodgins, WR, Oregon State
Round 7, pick 25 (No. 239 overall): Dane Jackson, CB, Pittsburgh

The Bills traded away their first round pick as part of the deal that brought them Stefon Diggs, but they made the most of the picks they did have. Multiple evaluators considered Epenesa to be a first-round prospect at some point in the draft process, and some called him the best bass rusher not named Chase Young. He was nearly a third round pick though and should be able to contribute right away to a Buffalo team that fielded a top five pass defense and a top 10 run defense last year. They also acquired a replacement for Frank Gore in Moss while bringing in two big receivers to provide versatility on the outside.

Carolina Panthers

Grade: B+

Picks

Round 1, pick 7: Derrick Brown, DT, Auburn
Round 2, pick 6 (No. 38): Yetur Gross-Matos, Edge, Penn State
Round 2, pick 32 (No. 64): Jeremy Chinn, S, Southern Illinois
Round 4, pick 7 (No. 113): Troy Pride Jr., CB, Notre Dame
Round 5, pick 6 (No. 152): Kenny Robinson, S, West Virginia
Round 6, pick 5 (No. 184): Bravvion Roy, DT, Baylor
Round 7, pick 7 (No. 221): Stantley Thomas-Oliver III, CB, Florida International

The Panthers lost the best linebacker in football and passed up on Isaiah Simmons for Brown at No. 7. According to ESPN’s David Newton, Carolina felt that the Clemson product’s versatility was better suited for a veteran team despite him being the best pure athlete available. Simmons could’ve helped stop the run and improved pass coverage. That isn’t to say Brown can’t be a great player, but this move could come back to bite the Panthers. Carolina is set on offense at basically every position at tight end, and it addressed its weaknesses by building on the front line and in secondary.

Chicago Bears

Grade: C+

Picks

Round 2, pick 11 (No. 43 overall): Cole Kmet, TE, Notre Dame
Round 2, pick 18 (No. 50 overall): Jaylon Johnson, CB, Utah
Round 5, pick 10 (No. 155): Trevis Gipson, OLB, Tulsa
Round 5, pick 18 (No. 163 overall): Kindle Vildor, CB, Georgia Southern
Round 5, pick 28 (No. 173 overall): Darnell Mooney, WR, Tulane
Round 7, pick 12 (No. 226 overall): Arlington Hambright, OT, Colorado
Round 7, pick 13 (No. 227 overall): Lachavious Simmons, OG, Tennessee State

The Bears selecting Kmet as the first tight end off the board raised some eyebrows — especially since they had 10 tight ends under contract in March. Chicago just signed Jimmy Graham this offseason and Kmet hasn’t won’t be a better aerial threat than the former Green Bay Packer. Kmet also struggles as a blocker, making the move more confusing. It isn’t all bad though, as Johnson has the ability to be a quality contributor in the secondary as a rookie.

Cincinnati Bengals

Grade: A+

Picks

Round 1, pick 1 (No. 1 overall): Joe Burrow, QB, LSU
Round 2, pick 1 (No. 33): Tee Higgins, WR, Clemson
Round 3, pick 1 (No. 65): Logan Wilson, LB, Wyoming
Round 4, pick 1 (No. 107): Akeem Davis-Gaither, LB, Appalachian State
Round 5, pick 1 (No. 147): Khalid Kareem, DE, Notre Dame
Round 6, pick 1 (No. 180): Hakeem Adeniji, OT, Kansas
Round 7, pick 1 (No. 215): Markus Bailey, ILB, Purdue

The Bengals got the cornerstone of their franchise in Burrow, and he has the potential to turn the entire franchise around and has the the tools to get off to strong start. The rookie will have A.J. Green and Tyler Boyd as returning starters, as well as Higgins, who idolized Green growing up and modeled his game after him. Burrow’s success will be amplified by the presence of Joe Mixon, as he’s used to having a reliable pass catcher out of the backfield. Don’t expect Cincinnati to dominant in 2020, but its future looks very bright.

Cleveland Browns

Grade: A

Picks:

Round 1, pick 10 (No. 10 overall): Jedrick Wills, OT, Alabama
Round 2, pick 12 (No. 44): Grant Delpit, S, LSU
Round 3, pick 24 (No. 88): Jordan Elliott, DT, Missouri
Round 3, pick 33 (No. 97): Jacob Phillips, LB, LSU
Round 4, pick 9 (No. 115): Harrison Bryant, TE, Florida Atlantic
Round 5, pick 14 (No. 160): Nick Harris, C, Washington
Round 6, pick 8 (No. 187): Donovan Peoples-Jones, WR, Michigan

After signing right tackle Jack Conklin in free agency, the Browns used their 10th overall pick to draft Alabama’s Jedrick Wills, who should take over at left tackle. After skimping on offensive line last offseason, the Browns made up for it in a big way this time around. That alone makes for a positive grade. Defense was the name of the game for their next three picks, as the took a safety, defensive lineman and linebacker in the second and third rounds. With their offensive skill positions set, the Browns needed to build up their defense and did just that.

Dallas Cowboys

Grade: A

Picks

Round 1, pick 17 (No. 17 overall): CeeDee Lamb, WR, Oklahoma
Round 2, pick 19 (No. 51): Trevon Diggs, CB, Alabama
Round 3, pick 18 (No. 82): Neville Gallimore, DT, Oklahoma
Round 4, pick 17 (No. 123): Reggie Robinson, CB, Tulsa
Round 4, pick 40 (No. 146): Tyler Biadasz, C, Wisconsin
Round 5, pick 33 (No. 179): Bradlee Anae, DE, Utah
Round 7, pick 17 (No. 231): Ben DiNucci, QB, James Madison

The Cowboys never thought that a player who is arguably the best wideout in the draft would fall into their laps at No. 17, but they surprisingly ended up with Lamb. Dallas was looking to replace Randall Cobb and now easily has the best receiving corps in the NFC East with Lamb, Amari Cooper, and Michael Gallup. Bringing in Diggs will help ease the secondary into losing Byron Jones in free agency. The Cowboys hit a home run, and Dak Prescott will have the kind of arsenal other quarterbacks dream about.

Denver Broncos

Grade: A

Picks

Round 1, pick 15 (No. 15 overall): Jerry Jeudy, WR, Alabama
Round 2, pick 14 (No. 46 overall): K.J. Hamler, WR, Penn State
Round 3, pick 13 (No. 77 overall): Michael Ojemudia, CB, Iowa
Round 3, pick 19 (No. 83 overall): Lloyd Cushenberry, C, LSU
Round 3, pick 31 (No. 95 overall): McTelvin Agim, DT, Arkansas
Round 4, pick 12 (No. 118 overall): Albert Okwuegbunam, TE, Missouri
Round 5, pick 32 (No. 178 overall): Justin Strnad, OLB, Wake Forest
Round 6, pick 2 (No. 181 overall): Netane Muti, OG, Fresno State
Round 7, pick 38 (No. 252 overall): Tyrie Cleveland, WR, Florida
Round 7, pick 40 (No. 254 overall): Derrek Tuszka, OLB, North Dakota State

The Broncos entered the draft with arguably the worst receiving corps in the league, but came away with the best route runner in the 2020 draft class, selecting Jeudy over CeeDee Lamb after Henry Ruggs came off the board. Jeudy will join Denver alongside the speedy Halmer, who claims to have run a sub 4.3 second 40-yard dash. Then there’s Cushenberry, who was Joe Burrow’s center at LSU and could play elsewhere on the Broncos’ offensive line. Drew Lock has a lot more to work with in year two and could improve considerably.

Detroit Lions

Grade: B-

Picks

Round 1, pick 3 (No. 3 overall): Jeffery Okudah, CB, Ohio State
Round 2, pick 3 (No. 35 overall): D’Andre Swift, RB, Georgia
Round 3, pick 3 (No. 67 overall): Julian Okwara, LB, Notre Dame
Round 3, pick 11 (No. 75 overall): Jonah Jackson, OG, Ohio State
Round 4, pick 15 (No. 121 overall): Logan Stenberg, OG, Kentucky
Round 5, pick 21 (No. 166 overall): Quintez Cephus, WR, Wisconsin
Round 5, pick 27 (No. 172 overall): Jason Huntley, RB, New Mexico State
Round 6, pick 18 (No. 197 overall): John Penisini, DT, Utah
Round 7, pick 21 (No. 235 overall): Jashon Cornell, DE, Ohio State

Not getting anything for their third overall pick was a bad start for the Lions, but they did get a great cornerback with Jeff Okudah and they needed him after parting ways with Darius Slay. With Kerryon Johnson already in Detroit, the team added D’Andre Swift with their 35th overall pick. Any running back that early isn’t going to be a value, especially in a deep running back draft like this one. He should be a positive for their offense, but there were more important and valuable positions to address at that point. Their third round went well, as they took EDGE rusher Julian Okwara and traded up for guard Jonah Jackson, two players who should make an instant impact at needed positions.

Green Bay Packers

Grade: C-

Picks

Round 1, pick 26 (No. 26 overall): Jordan Love, QB, Utah State
Round 2, pick 30 (No. 62 overall): A.J. Dillon, RB, Boston College
Round 3, pick 30 (No. 94 overall): Josiah Deguara, TE, Cincinnati
Round 5, pick 29 (No. 174 overall): Kamal Martin, OLB, Minnesota
Round 6, pick 13 (No. 192 overall): Jon Runyan, OT, Michigan
Round 6, pick 29 (No. 208 overall): Jake Hanson, C, Oregon
Round 6, pick 30 (No. 209 overall): Simon Stepaniak, OT, Indiana
Round 7, pick 22 (No. 236 overall): Vernon Scott, S, TCU
Round 7, pick 28 (No. 242 overall): Jonathan Garvin, DE, Miami

The Packers were one win away from reaching the Super Bowl with a depleted receiving corp, and their passing game might get weaker in 2020 without Jimmy Graham. Aaron Rodgers needed receivers to complement Davante Adams, but got a backup and a running back. Love probably won’t be playing anytime soon and Green Bay already has Aaron Jones in the backfield. The Packers missed a big opportunity to improve their offense.

Houston Texans

Grade: C

Picks

Round 2, pick 8 (No. 40 overall): Ross Blacklock, DT, TCU
Round 3, pick 26 (No. 90 overall): Jonathan Greenard, LB, Florida
Round 4, pick 20 (No. 126 overall): Charlie Heck, OT, North Carolina
Round 4, pick 35 (No. 141 overall): John Reid, CB, Penn State
Round 5, pick 26 (No. 171 overall): Isaiah Coulter, WR, Rhode Island

The Texans didn’t have a first round pick and their second round pick came from an awful trade where they let DeAndre Hopkins go to the Cardinals, so it is hard to grade this draft without that dark cloud hanging over the franchise. But, based on need, the team did fill some holes defensively, using their first two picks on the defensive line and third on the offensive line. Ross Blacklock and Jonathan Greenard are two players who should help shore up a defensive line that had gone from a strength to a weakness quickly. Of course, if GM/HC Bill O’Brien could have kept Jadeveon Clowney around, they wouldn’t be as weak at the position.

Indianapolis Colts

Grade: A

Picks

Round 2, pick 2 (No. 34 overall): Michael Pittman, WR, USC
Round 2, pick 9 (No. 41 overall): Jonathan Taylor, RB, Wisconsin
Round 3, pick 21 (No. 85 overall): Julian Blackmon, S, Utah
Round 4, pick 16 (No. 122 overall): Jacob Eason, QB, Washington
Round 5, pick 3 (No. 149 overall): Danny Pinter, OG, Ball State
Round 6, pick 14 (No. 193 overall): Robert Windsor, DT, Penn State
Round 6, pick 32 (No. 211 overall): Isaiah Rodgers, CB, UMass
Round 6, pick 33 (No. 212 overall): Dezmon Patmon, WR, Washington State
Round 6, pick 34 (No. 213 overall): Jordan Glasgow, ILB, Michigan

The Colts dealt away their first round pick for DeForest Buckner, who is immediately the best player on this defense. The Pittman and Taylor additions add some serious heft to an offense that was T.Y. Hilton, Marlon Mack, and not much else last season. Mack is solid, but Taylor as a complement is a big addition. Blackmon is a solid addition to the secondary. Eason gives them a big-armed prospect to develop behind Philip Rivers. The Colts are substantially better now than they were entering the draft.

Jacksonville Jaguars

Grade: B+

Picks

Round 1, pick 9 (No. 9 overall): C.J. Henderson, CB, Florida
Round 1, pick 20 (No. 20 overall): K’Lavon Chaisson, Edge, LSU
Round 2, pick 10 (No. 42 overall): Laviska Shenault, WR, Colorado
Round 3, pick 9 (No. 73 overall): Davon Hamilton, DT, Ohio State
Round 4, pick 10 (No. 116 overall): Ben Bartch, OG, St. John’s (MN)
Round 4, pick 31 (No. 137 overall): Josiah Scott, CB, Michigan State
Round 4, pick 34 (No. 140 overall): Shaquille Quarterman, ILB, Miami
Round 5, pick 12 (No. 157 overall): Daniel Thomas, S, Auburn
Round 5, pick 19 (No. 165 overall): Collin Johnson, WR, Texas
Round 6, pick 10 (No. 189 overall): Jake Luton, QB, Oregon State
Round 6, pick 27 (No. 206 overall): Tyler Davis, TE, Georgia Tech
Round 7, pick 9 (No. 223 overall): Chris Claybrooks, CB, Memphis

After letting go of some big defensive player contracts over the last year or so, the Jaguars looked to rebuild their defense in the first round, grabbing cornerback C.J. Henderson with the ninth pick and edge rusher K’Lavon Chaisson with the 20th pick. Chaisson was needed to take over for disgruntled Yannick Ngakoue and Henderson was needed to take over for previously disgruntled Jalen Ramsey and probably disgruntled A.J. Bouye. In the second round they added some instant offense with wide receiver Laviska Shenault. I like the pick, but I don’t know how well Jay Gruden will use him, as he’s not your prototypical receiver. Jacksonville had a slew of picks, with seven in the first four rounds and they used five on defense, one on receiver and one on offensive tackle. The team has plenty of holes to fill and they did a good job of grabbing useful players across the board. They also took a quarterback in the sixth round, selecting Oregon State’s Jake Luton, who is of course a project, but one with some long term upside.

Kansas City Chiefs

Grade: B+

Picks

Round 1, pick 32 (No. 32 overall): Clyde Edwards-Helaire, RB, LSU
Round 2, pick 31 (No. 63 overall): Willie Gay Jr, LB, Mississippi State
Round 3, pick 32 (No. 96 overall): Lucas Niang, OT, TCU
Round 4, pick 32 (No. 138 overall): L’Jarius Sneed, S, Louisiana Tech
Round 5, pick 31 (No. 177 overall): Mike Danna, DE, Michigan
Round 7, pick 23 (No. 237 overall): Thakarius Keyes, CB, Tulane

Grabbing running back Clyde Edwards-Helaire in the first round was a reach, but also one of the few needs the team had, as they had no consistency at running back until the playoffs last season. Betting on Damien Williams to show up in the playoffs like he did last season isn’t a bet that Andy Reid was willing to make. Their second pick was at linebacker, which was also a need, as the team was bad against running backs, both on the ground and through the air. Gay has good range and should start quickly and be an upgrade as long as he can stay out of trouble. After the first two picks filled their top two needs, they went with depth at tackle, secondary and defensive line. Overall, it was a successful draft for a team looking to run it back to the Super Bowl in 2020.

Los Angeles Chargers

Grade: B

Picks

Round 1, pick 6: Justin Herbert, QB, Oregon
Round 1, pick 23 (via NE): Kenneth Murray, LB, Oklahoma
Round 4, pick 6 (No. 112): Joshua Kelley, RB, UCLA
Round 5, pick 5 (No. 151): Joe Reed, WR, Virginia
Round 6, pick 7 (No. 186): Alohi Gilman, S, Notre Dame
Round 7, pick 6 (No. 220): K.J. Hill, WR, Ohio State

The Chargers got the second or third best quarterback prospect in the draft in Herbert. He has the prototypical size and arm strength to make use of all the weapons Los Angeles has. There’s a chance the rookie starts off playing behind Tyrod Taylor in 2020, but he has more long-term upside. Murray adds depth to an already impressive Chargers linebacker group. He can become an effective run stopper in the middle and aid the production of Joey Bosa and Melvin Ingram.

Los Angeles Rams

Grade: C

Picks

Round 2, No. 52 overall: Cam Akers, RB, Florida State
Round 2, No. 57: Van Jefferson, WR, Florida
Round 3, No. 84: Terrell Lewis, Edge, Alabama
Round 3, No. 104: Terrell Burgess, S, Utah
Round 4, No. 136: Brycen Hopkins, TE, Purdue
Round 6, No. 199: Jordan Fuller, S, Ohio State
Round 7, No. 234: Clay Johnston, ILB, Baylor
Round 7, No. 248: Sam Sloman, K, Miami (OH)
Round 7, No. 250: Tremayne Anchrum, OG, Clemson

The Rams got a shiny new running back in Akers who will likely be a contributor to the committee of running backs they’ll use in 2020. Jefferson is an elite technician as a route runner, but might end up as a WR3 or WR4 as a part of Los Angeles’ talented receiving corps. The Rams didn’t have a first round pick and might not have selected any starters for next season. But they still have a sturdy group of veterans on both sides of the ball.

Las Vegas Raiders

Grade: B+

Picks

Round 1, pick 12: Henry Ruggs III, WR, Alabama
Round 1, pick 19: Damon Arnette, CB, Ohio State
Round 3, pick 16 (No. 80): Lynn Bowden Jr., WR/RB/QB, Kentucky
Round 3, pick 17 (No. 81): Bryan Edwards, WR, South Carolina
Round 3, pick 36 (No. 100): Tanner Muse, S, Clemson
Round 4, pick 3 (No. 109): John Simpson, OG, Clemson
Round 4, pick 33 (No. 139): Amik Robertson, CB, Louisiana Tech

The ghost of Al Davis was in tow for the Raiders first round pick when they passed on CeeDee Lamb and Jerry Jeudy, opting for the 4.27 speedster Henry Ruggs out of Alabama. But, in the end, Ruggs was a no-doubt first-rounder and more of a preference versus a reach. Their second first-rounder was a cornerback, a big need for Las Vegas, but Damon Arnette wasn’t considered a first-rounder by many. Round three went to the offense, as Mayock and company grabbed all-purpose Swiss Army knife Lynn Bowden, who apparently will get a running back designation, but will likely be used all over the field. Maybe their best pick came with wide receiver Bryan Edwards, who saw his stock drop due to injuries. Now, they’ll just need Derek Carr to take a step up and facilitate his young offense into more points.

Miami Dolphins

Grade: B+

Picks

Round 1, pick 5 — Tua Tagovailoa, QB, Alabama
Round 1, pick 18 — Austin Jackson, OL, USC
Round 1, pick 26 — Noah Igbinoghene, CB, Auburn
Round 2, pick 7 (No. 39) — Robert Hunt, OT, UL
Round 2, pick 24 (No. 56) — Raekwon Davis, DT, Alabama
Round 3, pick 6 (No. 70) — Brandon Jones, S, Texas
Round 4, pick 5 (No. 11) — Solomon Kindley, G, Georgia
Round 5, pick 8 (No. 154) — Jason Strowbridge, DE, UNC
Round 5, pick 19 (No. 164) — Curtis Weaver, LB, Boise State
Round 6, pick 6 (No. 185) — Blake Ferguson, LS, LSU
Round 7, pick 32 (No. 246) — Malcolm Perry, RB, Navy
Round 7, pick 37 (No. 251) — Stephen Sullivan, TE, LSU

The long-term grade for this draft will likely come down to whether or not Tagovailoa develops into a franchise quarterback. Miami felt a bit hit-or-miss after the QB, with Jackson and Igbinoghene feeling like reaches. But with 11 picks, you can roll the dice a bit more My favorite move was trading a fifth round pick for 49ers running back Matt Breida. He’ll step in and upgrade the run game.

Minnesota Vikings

Grade: A-

Picks

Round 1, pick 22 (No. 22 overall): Justin Jefferson, WR, LSU
Round 1, pick 31 (No. 31): Jeff Gladney, CB, TCU
Round 2, pick 26 (No. 58): Ezra Cleveland, OT, Boise State
Round 3, pick 25 (No. 89): Cameron Dantzler, CB, Mississippi State
Round 4, pick 11 (No. 117): D.J. Wonnum, DE, South Carolina
Round 4, pick 24 (No. 130): James Lynch, DE, Baylor
Round 4, pick 26 (No. 132): Troy Dye, ILB, Oregon
Round 5, pick 24 (No. 169): Harrison Hand, CB, Temple
Round 5, pick 31 (No. 176): K.J. Osborn, WR, Miami
Round 6, pick 24 (No. 203): Blake Brandel, OT, Oregon State
Round 6, pick 26 (No. 205): Josh Metellus, S, Michigan
Round 7, pick 11 (No. 225): Kenny Willekes, DE, Michigan State
Round 7, pick 30 (No. 244): Nate Stanley, QB, Iowa
Round 7, pick 35 (No. 249): Brian Cole II, S, Mississippi State
Round 7, pick 39 (No. 253): Kyle Hinton, OG, Washburn

The Vikings had a huge haul of picks thanks to the Stefon Diggs trade, and with two more trades walked away with 15 picks. They scored with Justin Jefferson slipping down to No. 22. Speculation around Cleveland had him anywhere from late first to late second, but it’s a solid addition to protect Kirk Cousins. The additions of Gladney and Dantzler help re-tool a secondary that suffered serious turnover. They’ll get tested early as rookies, but they’re a solid pair to build around.

New England Patriots

Grade: B-

Picks

Round 2, pick 5 (No. 37 overall): Kyle Dugger, S, Lenoir–Rhyne
Round 2, pick 28 (No. 60): Josh Uche, LB, Michigan
Round 3, pick 23 (No. 87): Anfernee Jennings, Edge, Alabama
Round 3, pick 27 (No. 91): Devin Asiasi, TE, UCLA
Round 3, pick 37 (No. 101): Dalton Keene, TE, Virginia Tech
Round 5, pick 14 (No. 159): Justin Rohrwasser, K, Marshall
Round 6, pick 3 (No. 182): Michael Onwenu, OG, Michigan
Round 6, pick 16 (No. 195): Justin Herron, OT, Wake Forest
Round 6, pick 25 (No. 204): Cassh Maluia, ILB, Wyoming
Round 7, pick 16 (No. 230): Dustin Woodard, C, Memphis

This was a tough draft to figure out. Belichick traded out of the first round, and at times it felt like he was moving around with picks for the sake of moving around. He got some solid talent in Dugger and Uche, although you wonder if he reached a bit for the former. The kicker pick in the fifth round was baffling, but it was also confusing to see them not bother drafting a quarterback. If Belichick thinks Jarrett Stidham is the answer so be it. If they sign Cam Newton or Jameis Winston or trade for Andy Dalton, so be it. But for now, it’s an odd decision.

New Orleans Saints

Grade: B

Picks

Round 1, pick 24: Cesar Ruiz, C, Michigan
Round 3, pick 10 (No. 74): Zach Baun, LB, Wisconsin
Round 3, pick 41 (No. 105): Adam Trautman, TE, Dayton
Round 7, pick 26 (No. 241): Tommy Stevens, QB, Mississippi State

The Saints ended up with just three picks after trading down for their last two selections, but did a good job adding depth to an already strong offensive line and filling a big need at linebacker. The selection of Michigan offensive lineman Cesar Ruiz gives Drew Brees some needed padding in front of his aging body as the team looks to make another Super Bowl run before Brees is put out to pasture. They traded their day three picks to move into the end of the third round for Trautman, but then surprised folks by moving into the end of the seventh round to grab Stevens. That was an interesting decision.

New York Giants

Grade: B+

Picks

Round 1, pick 4: Andrew Thomas, OT, Georgia
Round 2, pick 4 (No. 36): Xavier McKinney, S, Alabama
Round 3, pick 35 (No. 99): Matt Peart, OT, Connecticut
Round 4, pick 4 (No. 110): Darnay Holmes, CB, UCLA
Round 5, pick 4 (No. 150): Shane Lemieux, OG, Oregon
Round 6, pick 4 (No. 183): Cam Brown, OLB, Penn State
Round 7, pick 4 (No. 218): Carter Coughlin, OLB, Minnesota
Round 7, pick 24 (No. 238): T.J. Brunson, ILB, South Carolina
Round 7, pick 33 (No. 247): Chris Williamson, CB, Minnesota
Round 7, pick 21 (No. 255): Tae Crowder, LB, Georgia

The Giants shocked quite a few people when they opted to select Thomas with the No. 4 pick, making him the first offensive lineman to be drafted. It was a toss up between severl candidates, and they’ll have to hope they picked the right one. Coming away with the top safety prospect in the draft was huge. New York bolstered its secondary by adding James Bradberry this offseason, and now it can field a better pass defense than it did in 2019.

New York Jets

Grade: B

Picks

Round 1, pick 11 overall: Mekhi Becton, OT, Louisville
Round 2, pick 27 (No. 59): Denzel Mims, WR, Baylor
Round 3, pick 4 (No. 68): Ashtyn Davis, S, Cal
Round 3, pick 15 (No. 79): Jabari Zuniga, Edge, Florida
Round 4, pick 14 (No. 120): La’Mical Perine, RB, Florida
Round 4, pick 19 (No. 125): James Morgan, QB, Florida International
Round 4, pick 23 (No. 129): Cameron Clark, OT, UNC Charlotte
Round 5, pick 12 (No. 158): Bryce Hall, CB, Virginia
Round 6, pick 12 (No. 191): Braden Mann, P, Texas A&M

The Jets took a risk by selecting the mountain of a man that is Becton with their first pick. He’ll address some much needed help on their offensive line. They settled with a starting receiving duo consisting of Breshad Perriman and Jamison Crowder rather than selecting a top prospect. But trading down for Mims was a strong move to solidify the receiving corps. Davis is a sneaky good pickup who can get some plays in at safety and contribute with elite athleticism as a return man.

Philadelphia Eagles

Grade: B+

Picks

Round 1, pick 21 (No. 21 overall): Jalen Reagor, WR, TCU
Round 2, pick 21 (No. 53): Jalen Hurts, QB, Oklahoma
Round 3, pick 39 (No. 103): Davion Taylor, LB, Colorado
Round 4, pick 21 (No. 127): K’Von Wallace, S, Clemson
Round 4, pick 39 (No. 145): Jack Driscoll, OG, Auburn
Round 5, pick 22 (No. 168): John Hightower, WR, Boise State
Round 6, pick 17 (No. 196): Shaun Bradley, ILB, Temple
Round 6, pick 21 (No. 200): Quez Watkins, WR, Southern Mississippi
Round 6, pick 31 (No. 210): Prince Tega Wanogho, OT, Auburn
Round 7, pick 19 (No. 233): Casey Toohill, DE, Stanford

The Eagles draft certainly was something. The elephant in the room is the Hurts pick. It makes sense to add talent, but could they have maybe waited into the third? If not, so be it. The upside to the pick is tremendous, but it feels like he’s basically going to be an A or F player. For 2020 though, the name of the game was speed for the receiver corps. Reagon, Hightower, Watkins, and the trade for Marquise Goodwin bring serious speed to the receivers. The defensive picks are not immediate impact guys, but I like what they did on offense, and I can get behind the Hurts pick.

Pittsburgh Steelers

Grade: B-

Picks

Round 2, pick 17 (No. 49 overall): Chase Claypool, WR, Notre Dame
Round 3, pick 38 (No. 102): Alex Highsmith, DE, UNC Charlotte
Round 4, pick 18 (No. 124): Anthony McFarland Jr., RB, Maryland
Round 4, pick 29 (No. 135): Kevin Dotson, OG, Louisiana
Round 6, pick 19 (No. 198): Antoine Brooks, Jr., S, Maryland
Round 7, pick 18 (No. 232): Carlos Davis, DT, Nebraska

After trading away their first rounder for Minkah Fitzpatrick last season, we can give them a positive grade for that trade based on how well Fitzpatrick played last year. With their first draft pick, they took big and fast wide receiver Chase Claypool. There is plenty of upside with Claypool and he is instant offense if he can get the ball in his hands, but receiver didn’t feel like a need this early. Of course, the Steelers have been excellent wide receiver evaluators and they may let JuJu Smith-Schuster walk next offseason. The third round brought in pass rusher Alex Highsmith, who has a wide range of outcomes but was extremely productive in Charlotte. It did look like the Steelers might go with a running back earlier due to James Conner’s injury troubles, but they instead waited and added a complementary back in Anthony McFarland with the 124th pick, getting good value there. They took a guard with their second fourth-round pick, which was a need I thought they may address earlier, but it was still good to grab one before their next pick which was in the nether-rounds.

San Francisco 49ers

Grade: B+

Picks

Round 1, pick 14 (No. 14 overall): Javon Kinlaw, DT, South Carolina
Round 1, pick 25 (No. 25): Brandon Aiyuk, WR, Arizona State
Round 5, pick 7 (No. 153 overall): Colton McIvitz, OT, West Virginia
Round 6, pick 11 (No. 190): Charlie Woerner, TE, Georgia
Round 7, pick 3 (No. 217): Jauan Jennings, WR, Tennessee

The 49ers were expected to be do some dealing, and they did not disappoint — albeit not quite like people expected. They moved back one spot in the first, but then moved up at the end of the first to leave them without a day two pick. They replaced DeForest Buckner with their first pick and Emmanuel Sanders with their second pick. They made some depth additions on day three, but really this was about acquiring Trent Williams for a fifth round pick and 2021 third. This is a team that drafted looking to return to the Super Bowl rather than maybe take a step back in 2020. This is really a placeholder grade for what happens over the 2020 season.

Seattle Seahawks

Grade: C

Picks

Round 1, pick 27 (No. 27 overall): Jordyn Brooks, LB, Texas Tech
Round 2, pick 16 (No. 48): Darrell Taylor, Edge, Tennessee
Round 3, pick 5 (No. 69): Damien Lewis, OG, LSU
Round 4, pick 27 (No. 133): Colby Parkinson, TE, Stanford
Round 4, pick 38 (No. 144): DeeJay Dallas, RB, Miami
Round 5, pick 2 (No. 148): Alton Robinson, DE, Syracus
Round 6, pick 35 (No. 214): Freddie Swain, WR, Florida

The Seahawks addressed their defense in the first two rounds, but they appear to have overreached on both picks. They’ve hit on diamonds in the rough in the past, but it usually comes from later round picks. Brooks and Taylor both seemingly could have been had later, and you could say that for most of their picks. Seattle addressed needs, but at what cost?

Tampa Bay Buccaneers

Grade: B-

Picks

Round 1, pick 13 (No. 13 overall): Tristan Wirfs, OT, Iowa
Round 2, pick 13 (No. 45): Antoine Winfield, S, Minnesota
Round 3, pick 12 (No. 76): Ke’Shawn Vaughn, RB, Vanderbilt
Round 5, pick 15 (No. 161): Tyler Johnson, WR, Minnesota
Round 6, pick 15 (No. 194): Khalil Davis, DT, Nebraska
Round 7, pick 27 (No. 241): Chapelle Russell, OLB, Temple
Round 7, pick 31 (No. 245): Raymond Calais, RB, Louisiana

They hit on their most important pick, adding protection for Tom Brady in the first round. It cost them a fourth to move up a single spot, which is the only reason to ding the pick. Landing Winfield where they did was a solid value, but they overreached for Ke;Shawn Vaughn. I get the need to complement Ronald Jones, but this pick didn’t wow me. The Bucs could still add more talent in free agency, but the draft was a bit underwhelming on the back end.

Tennessee Titans

Grade: B+

Picks

Round 1, pick 29: Isaiah Wilson, OL, Georgia
Round 2, pick 29 (No. 61): Kristian Fulton, CB, LSU
Round 3, pick 29 (No. 93): Darrynton Evans, RB, Appalachian State
Round 5, pick 14 (No. 174): Larrell Murchison, DT, NC State
Round 7, pick 10 (No. 224): Chris Claybrooks, CB, Memphis
Round 7, pick 29 (No. 243): Chris Jackson, S, Marshall

The Titans needed help on the line and they get it in Wilson. He’s not a sexy pick, but he’s a valuable one for protecting Ryan Tannehill and opening up holes for Derrick Henry. The Fulton pick is a fantastic one and a surprise given his slip in the draft. They added a complement to Derrick Henry, which was needed with Dion Lewis’ departure. Given Henry’s workload last year, Evans could end up busy as a rookie.

Washington

Grade: B

Picks

Round 1, pick 2 (No. 2 overall): Chase Young, Edge, Ohio State
Round 3, pick 2 (No. 66): Antonio Gibson, WR, Memphis
Round 4, pick 2 (No. 108): Saadhiq Charles, OT, LSU
Round 4, pick 36 (No. 142): Antonio Gandy-Golden, WR, Liberty
Round 5, pick 10 (No. 156): Keith Ismael, C, San Diego State
Round 5, pick 17 (No. 162): Khaleke Hudson, OLB, Michigan
Round 7, pick 2 (No. 216): Kamren Curl, S, Arkansas
Round 7, pick 15 (No. 229): James Smith-Williams, DE, N.C. State

Washington started out grabbing the best player in the draft when they took EDGE defender Chase Young second overall. After that strong start, they didn’t have a second round pick, limiting their chances at a strong offensive lineman, which they needed badly. IN the third they took offensive weapon Antonio Gibson, who has tremendous upside but no real position. It’s a pick I like for a team lacking offense, but it means they couldn’t grab an offensive lineman until round four, which they did. With their 142nd pick they got nice upside at wide receiver with Antonio Gandy-Golden out of Liberty and then traded Trent Williams to the 49ers for the 156th pick and a 2021 third-rounder. That trade wasn’t close to what they wanted for Williams, but at this point it was an albatross around their neck and getting anything for him while ending the speculation was a positive. They then turned that pick into another offensive lineman, which was more than needed.