clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

Iowa State plans on no single game ticket sales, Steelers held back 1⁄2 their 2020 allotment

Football season is months away, but pro and college teams are figuring out next steps during the Covid-19 pandemic. We break down the latest news surrounding the Iowa State Cyclones and Pittsburgh Steelers.

General view as fans watch the match-up between the Iowa State Cyclones and the Kansas Jayhawks on October 3, 2015 at Jack Trice Stadium, in Ames, Iowa. Photo by Matthew Holst/Getty Images

The NFL and college football have had the most lead time to figure out their plans for playing amidst the Covid-19 pandemic, and we’re starting to see some adjustments when it comes to ticketing. Neither sport has entirely ruled put playing games with no fans, but they are preparing to adjust to a reality of having fewer fans in attendance.

Iowa State University athletic director Jamie Pollard announced on Tuesday the university fully expects to play football in the fall, but current guidelines would require attendance at Jack Trice Stadium be limited to approximately 50 percent of capacity. That would limit per-game attendance to 30,000 spectators. Pollard said approximately 22,000 season tickets have been renewed for the fall, leaving approximately 8,000 seats to be filled. The university is limiting tickets to season ticket purchases, with no single game sales at all this season.

Last week, Pittsburgh Steelers single game tickets went on sale. Team PR director Burt Lauten announced on Twitter the team held back 50 percent of the normal inventory to be proactive for possible social distancing scenarios at Heinz Field this fall.

Both announcements leave room for change if the situation improves between now and the start of the season. Pollard specifically reference current regulations, which are subject to change. It is an unpredictable situation, with states figuring things out day-to-day and week-to-week. Any predictions about what the situation will look like three months from now are guesses at best, particularly those from non-scientists.